Monday, September 18, 2006

Nobody Expects the Spanish Inquisition

So yea, Blogger in Beta isn't as super awesome as I had originally anticipated. Can't comment on non-beta blogs, can't post YouTube files, can't get any new super sweet templates. It's kinda lame. So, we wait for it to come OUT of Beta. Until then, here's some interesting headlines:

Be heard.

The Associated Press is a terrorist organization

Microsoft vs. Apple Round 3

Walking Shark found in Bird's Head

Silly Walk Generator

And I also heard that gas was going to continue to fall in price as we get closer to the electi.....Thanksgiving.

In lighter news, I finished The Brothers Karamazov. Such a good book. I'm not sure how I feel about the ending. So much uncertainty. There's also the deification of a major character. Granted, Doestoevsky makes no bones about who the hero of the novel is. He tells you in the opening chapter. Regardless, if you haven't read this book, I highly(!) recommend it. One of the most intriguing parts of the novel goes like this:

Many many moons ago, in a small town in Spain, Jesus returned to Earth. This was during the height of the Inquisition. While Jesus was performing his first miracles, during his first hour back on Earth, the Grand Inquisitor sees him, catches him in the act. The Inquisitor looks at Jesus, and has him arrested, so great is the power that he holds through fear. What follows in the prison of the Inquisition is the Grandest Inquisition ever heard. Jesus listens unflinchingly, uninteruptively. The Inquisitor breaks down the three temptations of Christ in the desert, and how through those three denials of Christ (bread, angelic protection, and the ultimate denial of power and control), He had relinquished all his control over men, for if any man controls the means of sustenance and protection for the masses, that man will be he who is worshipped by the people, for Man is weak, and not perfect, like Christ, and not capable of refusing such dire, neccesary and base elements of this world.
So, the inquisitor, in closing says to Christ "thou cantst return," since He had already passed the keys. The Inquisitor's position was that so long as the Papacy existed and that that order which possessed the keys to the Kingdom of God was held infallable in the eyes of Man and God, that Jesus had no right to come back and that it would undo all He had wrought.

One other story, also of strong religious connotations goes like this:

An agnostic man, strong in his disbelief in God and all faiths, notorious among he community and peers for being such a devout agnostic died. And when he died he found himself in a great void, alone. A voice echoed through the darkness that he was to walk a Trillion miles at the end of which he would arive at the gates of heaven. Hearing this, he scoffed, and lay down, and went to sleep.
There he sat, now sleeping, now awake, for many thousands of years, when suddenly, one day, perhaps consumed by boredom, the man rose and began walking. And after an eternity he arrived at the gates of heaven and was welcomed into the Kingdom whereupon he exclaimed, through weeping eyes that he would walk a Trillion Trillions of miles to be there in the presence of the Lord.

Read this book.

I need a new one. I'm debating One Hundred Years of Solitude, Arabian Knights, or Pilgrim's Progress. You can vote in the new poll!

Well, all, it's Daily Show time. Hopefully I'll be able to put up some video's soon, for there are a few I'd like to discuss with ya'll.

2 comments:

Andronicus said...

Thanks a lot for leading me down this path! Jerk.

Andronicus said...

"as the Papacy existed and that that order which possessed the keys to the Kingdom of God was held infallable in the eyes of Man and God, that Jesus had no right to come back and that it would undo all He had wrought."


That's brilliant!!! Poor Jesus can't win.